Primex Protects Clients from the Heartbleed Bug

The Heartbleed bug has emerged this week as the most severe Internet threat in the past 12 to 24 months. Heartbleed strikes at a weakness in the OpenSSL library could allow attackers access to secure information, such as user names, passwords, and other sensitive data. According to www.heartbleed.com, this vulnerability “… allows stealing the information protected … by the SSL/TLS encryption used to secure the Internet.”

In short, the vulnerability exploits a weakness in the very engines used for protection. What is the risk? Attackers could steal data and secret keys, listen to secure communications, and access data directly from application services.

Primex Wireless Invests Heavily in Security

For most Primex Wireless customers, the Application Management Platform (AMP), the software hub of the Synchronous Network System (SNS), is deployed on the LAN-side of client networks. This is how the application was designed to be used and keeps the software and data separate from Internet threats such as Heartbleed.

The recent AMP 5.0 release was specifically designed for Internet-based hosting, and has a robust application stack designed to protect the application and data from Internet vulnerabilities. This includes the selection of CentOS as the new operating system for AMP version 5.0. With a reputation for being stable and predictable, CentOS is closely aligned with Red Hat Linux and is powered by a team of core technologists committed to performance and security. With one update and a quick reboot, any AMP 5.0 appliance can be updated and protected from the Heartbleed vulnerability. Within hours of the Internet bulletins announcing the Heartbleed threat, all Primex hosted AMP 5.0 servers were updated and protected.

Primex Wireless will continue to invest the resources to stay ahead of security threats. Our commitment to reliability and the inviolability of our client’s information is evidenced by the performance of our new PrimexTEMP and PrimexIAQ sensor platform, and shown in our ability to respond rapidly with AMP 5.0 to the Heartbleed threat.

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